Strategic Warfare: How to Thrive on the Battleground

Okay, it’s not a secret in my house, so I might as well share it with you: I hate almost all bugs. God has a purpose for all living things . . . I know that.

Woman_cleaning_toilets
By Emergency Brake [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

However, I find it quite rude when vermin sneak around my house, bite or sting at will, and then mosey back to their little hideaways.

I also hate bacteria and viruses because they are invisible to the naked eye. How well can we fight something potentially deadly that we can’t even see?

It’s time to make the decision to talk with the Lord today—to thank Him for the hard times because they have caused you to plunge into His sovereign care.

An Agent of Change in a Suffering World

Ten minutes and her life was forever changed. It was a beautiful morning as my friend headed out the door for work. She called her husband to wish him a good day as she walked to her car.

Change
(Image from Unsplash)

During the phone call, she heard a sound behind her and looked to see what it was. She was being ambushed. A surge of “fight or flight” chemicals flooded her body just as the first punch smashed her jaw.

Learning to Wait in the Waiting Room

There is a place I used to call my second home: the waiting room. I’ll never forget the hours I spent with my special-needs son in waiting rooms—rooms with tattered magazines, crying children, and tired-looking people who were staring at smudged, blandly painted walls.

Waiting Room
photo credit: jeffk The Cruel Waiting Room via photopin (license)

If there were windows, I watched the outside world whirl by—beautiful women out and about, men in pressed suits connected to cell phones.

I would get stuck in my thoughts . . . somewhere between envious and anxious, weary and worried. I wondered when the waiting would end.

The choice—offered to every person—is to believe God and actively participate in whatever He allows, regardless of what we feel, experience, lose, gain, or see in our human, day-to-day lives.

Does Anyone See Me?

So, there we were—my mother, my sister, my three children, and I—walking through the airport to get to the gate for our flight home. There should be awards for mothers who travel with teenagers—the heaps of luggage . . .

See me
(Image from Unsplash)

The stops for sodas and snacks . . . the children deaf to anything other than electronics and texting! We had just been processed through security like cows being put into the squeeze.

The undressing, checking, rechecking, and dressing again is an athletic event for us all.

It’s more difficult with younger children than with teens and almost impossible with a special-needs child who is a teen. It can be hysterically funny watching people attempt this obstacle course—but not so much when it’s you!

Beauty Unimagined: Mending and Marriage

I nearly incinerated my finger with a hot glue gun a while back. I was working on a project for my daughter’s wedding and almost welded my finger to the table.

scrapbook
Photo by Colleen Swindoll Thompson

While I soaked one hand in ice, with the other I dusted off the pages of her baby books and began thumbing through them.

One turn of a page and time slowed. Her sassy smile, blonde curls, little round face resting on her soft pillow almost looked through me at that moment.

The button-trimmed page lined with pink presented the illusion that I could keep her life—our lives—from being flawed and damaged. The sun set, my finger cooled, and the visual reminders of days gone by sunk deep into my soul.